Characterizing Groundwater and Surface-Water Interaction in the Mississippi Delta Using Hydrograph Separation

Tuesday, December 5, 2017: 1:20 p.m.
101 C (Music City Center)
Courtney Killian , Geosciences, Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, MS
Jeannie Barlow, PhD , Lower Mississippi-Gulf Water Science Center, U.S. Geological Survey, Jackson, MS
Paul Barlow , U.S. Geologic Survey WRD, Northborough, MA
Wade Kress , Lower Mississippi-Gulf Water Science Center, U.S. Geological Survey, Nashville, TN
Darrel Schmitz, PhD , Geosciences, Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, MS

Understanding the relationship between groundwater withdrawals and aquifer response can allow for the estimation of changes in groundwater availability over time and help determine best water-resource-management practices to sustain groundwater and surface water resources for agricultural irrigation, ecological flow, and other uses. An increase in groundwater withdrawals from the Mississippi River valley alluvial (MRVA) aquifer for agricultural irrigation has resulted in stream and groundwater level declines in the Mississippi Delta region, in northwest Mississippi. In 2016, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) began a study to better understand the effects of pumping on groundwater availability in the alluvial aquifer. Two USGS continuous continuous-gaging stations and co-located piezometers provided hydrologic data to characterized groundwater/surface-water interaction at two sites in the Delta. The sites are located at the Sunflower River at Sunflower, Mississippi and the Tallahatchie River at Money, Mississippi. Baseflow, the amount of groundwater that contributes to streamflow, was estimated at each site using hydrograph-separation and trend-analysis techniques provided in the USGS Groundwater Toolbox open-source software. Recently collected streambed resistivity data provided insight into the variability of hydraulic connectivity along streambeds and values were compared with the hydrograph separation and trend analysis results. This combination of techniques allowed for better characterization of the hydrogeologic conditions and the groundwater/surface-water interactions at the selected site. Characterizing hydrologic relations such as this will help refine a regional groundwater model of the Delta that will aid water-resource managers in future decisions pertaining to groundwater availability of the alluvial aquifer.
Courtney Killian, Geosciences, Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, MS
Hydrologist


Jeannie Barlow, PhD, Lower Mississippi-Gulf Water Science Center, U.S. Geological Survey, Jackson, MS
Research Hydrologist


Paul Barlow, U.S. Geologic Survey WRD, Northborough, MA
Dr. Paul Barlow is a hydrologist with the U.S. Geological Survey’s Office of Groundwater, where he contributes to the development and application of computer models for simulation of groundwater systems and stream-aquifer interactions. He received an undergraduate degree in geology and graduate degrees in hydrology and environmental engineering.


Wade Kress, Lower Mississippi-Gulf Water Science Center, U.S. Geological Survey, Nashville, TN
Wade Kress has been a hydrologist for the U.S. Geological Survey since 1996. He has a BS in geology from Louisiana Tech University and is currently working on an MSc in petroleum geosciences at the Petroleum Institute in Abu Dhabi. Wade has worked throughout the United States as well as the United Arab Emirates on environmental and hydrogeologic framework projects specializing in the application of hydrogeophysics


Darrel Schmitz, PhD, Geosciences, Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, MS
Professor


NGWA Groundwater Summit is being held in conjunction with Groundwater Week.

Find out more about NGWA and our events.

National Ground Water Association
601 Dempsey Road
Westerville, Ohio 43081
USA
Phone 614 898.7791
(toll-free within the United States 800 551.7379)
Fax 614 898.7786
Email ngwa@ngwa.org

Websites:

http://www.ngwa.org/ —home site of NGWA

http://www.wellowner.org — information for well owners