Removal of Chlorinated Solvents in Groundwater Using Immobilized Nano Zero-Valent Iron for Advanced Oxidation Processes

Monday, December 3, 2018: 10:20 a.m.
N119/120 (Las Vegas Convention Center)
Erick Bandala , Division of Hydrologic Sciences, Desert Research Institute, Las Vegas, NV
Soroosh Mortazavian , Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV
Jaeyun Moon, Ph.D. , Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV
Helga Sato , Division of Hydrologic Sciences, Desert Research Institute, Las Vegas, NV

Advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) are powerful methods for water treatment, particularly to eliminate organic contaminants. Developing novel catalysts with enhanced hydroxyl radical generation properties leads to improved efficiency of AOPs. In this study, nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) immobilized in biochar (SBA-15) was synthesized using the two-solvent method. Several different samples were synthesized with different iron to silicon (Fe/Si) ratios and using different synthetic conditions including pH, and ultrasonication. The immobilization of ZVI nanoparticles in the biochar particles was confirmed using material characterization tools. The composition analysis results of nZVI/biochar samples verified the efficient use of materials and suggested a correlation of the synthetic conditions and the performance of the catalysts. The synthesized materials were tested for hydroxyl radical (•OH) production. The results revealed high •OH production, particularly when 500 mg/L of the catalyst sample was used. Addition of peroxymonosulfate ion to the reaction mixture resulted in a significant increase in •OH production. The best reaction conditions were tested for the degradation of trichloroethylene and tetrachloroethylene as model chlorinated solvents. Different reaction conditions were tested to simulate water quality conditions potentially found in real groundwater such as pH and ionic strength. The novel material investigated here showed interesting characteristics as Fenton-like reaction catalyst, and worth being assessed for further environmental applications, such as soil treatment, site restoration, or the removal of contaminants from wastewater effluents.
Erick Bandala, Division of Hydrologic Sciences, Desert Research Institute, Las Vegas, NV
Dr. Bandala performs research in water quality, water treatment and site restoration. His major experience is in developing countries on the generation and adaptation of technology for the generation of safe drinking water and proper sanitation. Development and implementation of cutting-edge analytical approach to chemical and microbiological water quality is also within his areas of expertise. Specific research interest includes solar driven Advanced Oxidation Processes, assessing the effect of Climate Change on water quality, developing adaptive technologies for sustainable water quality management, water chemistry, stormwater quality and treatment. Further areas of interest are: site restoration, non-conventional energy sources and the effect of water quality on human health. He holds a PH.D. degree in Engineering, M.Sc. degree in Organic Chemistry and B.Eng. degree in Chemical Engineering. Dr. Bandala is author or co-author of over 100 publications including 68 peer-reviewed papers (average impact factor 2.7, >1530 citations, h-index 22); 5 books, 28 book chapters and 60 works published in proceedings of international conferences. He also possess wide experience working as consultant working with different companies along North and South America.



Soroosh Mortazavian, Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV
TBD


Jaeyun Moon, Ph.D., Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV
TBD


Helga Sato, Division of Hydrologic Sciences, Desert Research Institute, Las Vegas, NV
TBD